Posted by Craig Borlase on 24 April 2013

 

With terrorism back on home soil and dominating the news, the role of worship songs might not seem like the most urgent topic. But when I walked into a funeral yesterday, I was reminded that whenever tragedy strikes - in whatever form - what we sing in church matters more than ever. And because of that fact, it raises questions like these…

* Why do none of our songs really express our pain, fear and sorrow?

* Are we worried that too much pain and sorrow in our songs will be make people think we’re lacking in faith?

* Does every song have to resolve with the happy ending of salvation, or would you sing a worship song that remained in the pain of grief throughout?

* Is there a place for an absence of words, letting the music express our darker emotions?

More like this

The Bali 9, Executed As They Sang 10,000 Reasons

"Their worship was cut short by gunfire...Matt Redman reflects on the Bali 9, executed as they sang 10,000 Reasons..." Forget winning two Grammy Awards and a stint at the top of the Billboard Christian Songs chart, `'10,000 Reasons" is a song that made the news recently for an even more surprising reason....

Paul Potts And The Story Of Hope

Paul Potts was a mobile phone salesman with a love of singing, a history of being bullied and a hope that somehow the gift within him might find release. And it did.....

Song Devotional - Come To Save Us

The single most significant point that there has ever been in human history didn’t start out all that impressive. The life, death and resurrection of Jesus began with a birth that confounded expectations and rewrote the rules. And yet, there was majesty in the manger. But why did it have to be that way? Join this little wander through the Bible's back streets, as worship gets truly festive.