Posted by Lou Fellingham on 19 April 2017

2016 was a challenging year for us. We were stepping out and believing in God’s promises but not necessarily seeing the fruit of what we were believing for straight away. We had to dig deep. It felt like a year of investment both in the natural and the supernatural. Along the way God gave us pockets of encouragement, moments of relief, windows of light where He encouraged us to keep going, keep believing. He provided for us financially when things were tight and generally held us when it felt like we had no strength left.

During this season a friend posted the words to an old hymn called ‘He giveth more grace’ by a lady called Annie J Flint. These words came at just the right time and were a comfort to me on many occasions. Two lines in particular struck me… the first was ‘when we’ve reached the end of our earthly resources, our father’s full giving is only begun’ and ‘out of His infinite riches in Jesus, He giveth and giveth and giveth again’.

One of the beautiful things about being a believer in Jesus is the word grace. It means that we cannot earn God’s love or favour or kindness or compassion or salvation. There’s no need to strive in life. So often we can feel like we’ve reached our max but there’s still so much to do.

Isaiah 40:27-31 describes us having an everlasting God who never grows tired or weary, doesn’t run out of energy, who is full of understanding. It then goes on to say that if we wait on God, if we come to Him and find our rest in Him He will renew our strength. It says He will give power to the faint and to those who have no might, He will increase their strength!

Not only do we have a God who is Everlasting and never grows tired, the promise is that as we find our strength in Christ we don’t just survive, but we will run and not be weary, we will walk and not be faint. What promises we have in Him!

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