Posted by Craig Borlase on 18 October 2013

There’s a long history of slaves worshipping through song. From the freshly-freed Israelites in Exodus 15 to the sounds of the Negro spirituals expressing the hope of going home, their songs have become ours. God is never far from the oppressed, and worship is often at its loudest when it comes from the lips of those who are not free.

 

Today - Anti Slavery Day - is a day to be shocked. The very fact that modern day slavery even exists - let alone thrives - should disturb us all. It should shock us that the fingerprints of modern day slaves are found on our clothes and on our food. It should shock us that men, women and children can be bought, sold and profited from so easily. 

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mWVdiKCqdwU&feature=youtu.be

 

But, as worship leaders, there’s another challenge, and it is this: if we believe that slavery is wrong and that worship has a part to play in putting it right, then what are we going to do about it?

Moses heard the worship song of his people, and no chains could silence the slaves taken from Africa. But who hears the voices of the modern day slaves?

Who will sing for them?

Who will share their stories?

Who will put worship into action and spend their resources to set them free?

If not us, then who?

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