Posted by Craig Borlase on 8 November 2013

 

Click here to take a look at the breathtaking beauty of the Sistine Chapel, courtesy of a great little corner of the Vatican website. If you’ve never been in person, this site will get you closer than ever. 

As far as worshipful art goes, it’s hard to think of a better example. But what do you see when you look at it? What aspect of our story as God’s children stands out? Where do your eyes drag your fingers? 

And what does this mean for us as those who use our own hands to create art that tries to guide people to gaze at God? The style may be dated, but the skill, the vision, the commitment are still tangible - even through these pixels. Does this inspire us to aim a little higher with our creativity? (And if not, what on earth would?)

Finally, consider the breadth of the God’s story that the frescoes tell. When we get up to lead, are we helping them to see more of God, or do we seem to get stuck in the same corner, returning to the same themes and stories?

 

 

 

 

 

 

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