Posted by Craig Borlase on 6 December 2013

 

‘I have walked that long road to freedom. I have tried not to falter; I have made missteps along the way. But I have discovered the secret that, after climbing a great hill, one only finds that there are many more hills to climb. I have taken a moment here to rest, to steal a view of the glorious vista that surrounds me, to look back on the distance I have come. But I can only rest for a moment, for with freedom comes responsibilities, and I dare not linger, for my long walk is not ended.’

 

Whether you’re staring up at a hill that towers above you or you’re standing with lungs and legs burning as you look back on the distance you have come, are you ready to push on, to take the next steps? Are you determined not to linger?

 

Or maybe it is other people’s journeys that need your attention today. Can you extend grace, encouragement, strength or support to someone struggling along theirs?

 

And the next time you stand up to help your friends and family sing songs that tell of God’s love and mercy, will you remember the long walk that all of us are on - the trek from exile back towards home - and use those songs to bring others in to join us?

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