Posted by Miriam Webster on 8 May 2015

It started with a dream. Not just a picture or a sense impression, but one of those dreams so real it refuses to fade once the day starts. “I woke from sleeping to remember I had just been standing in a crowd”, says songwriter Miriam Webster. “I was watching as a street performer was doing some tricks and had this big crowd around him. Suddenly he snapped his fingers and had them all in a trance, all except for me. Their heads hung down as eyes rolled and closed. As I started to leave I found myself speaking out 'the blood of Jesus'. As I left, the guy looked straight at me, completely stunned. He was shocked that I’d not fallen under his spell, but I kept on moving with those same words.”

“Instantly it reminded me of the verse from 1 John 5:19: “We know that we are children of God, and that the world around us is under the control of the evil one.” So I started to sing about this dream not long after and those lyrics became the verses. Then I found music of a chorus that I’d worked on during a season when I was waking up with songs in my head. I joined them together and that’s how Forever Thankful came into being.”

But ‘Forever Thankful’ is not a song about spiritual warfare or an epic in the vein of Revelation Song. It’s a song about salvation. It’s about the power of Jesus to overcome any obstacle and break through any troubles. It’s about freedom and hope and the simple fact that when we see for ourselves the power that the blood of Jesus has to break any and every chain, we can’t help but be thankful.

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