Posted by Susie Woodbridge on 24 November 2014

Do we sometimes get so caught up with life that we feel like God is distant, that He has retreated from us, that we are feeling the weight of our burdens because of it? The truth is, He is the Constant. He is always there, and He wants to encounter us. Not just once a week on a Sunday but continually, and forever.

God longs not for us to build him into our lives, but for us to build our lives in and through Him. Rather than merely accommodate Him, we can live from the shelter of His wings in the presence of the Holy Spirit. Only in that place of complete dependence on Him will we find a true hope. And it's only in that place that we begin to feel the weight of the world being lifted off and we see healing.

In that moment of surrender, He gives us incomprehensible peace. His presence is the breath of life that draws us closer to God. When we ask His Spirit to fall, we surrender our will and He gladly reminds us of His continual encounter with us because we are His beloved children. It is this place from which we start to live our lives in Christ. Not so much ‘I have Jesus’ but more ‘Jesus has me’ - and with a true knowledge of belonging to our Father. As we submit our control to His Spirit we find abundant life and a universe of freedom.

Are you ready for it?

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