Posted by Simon Campling on 28 July 2015

For some the capo is seen as a crutch, but to the majority of guitarists it is an extremely helpful tool – whether it’s to play more comfortable chords in different keys or to create a sonic difference between multiple guitars, a good capo is a very handy thing to have around.

So what about using two capos…

Well, I say two capos. What I really mean is using a partial capo that covers 3 strings, which can sometimes mean using two capos at once. While a partial capo can be used in various different ways depending on how creative and adventurous the user is, I’m going to talk about two different positions for the capo that I think are great for worship leaders to give a fresh sound to very familiar chord patterns.

The first position has the capo on the second fret (relative to the nut or a full capo) covering the A-D-G strings. Strum the open strings and you have an Esus4 chord shape, meaning it’s very similar to being in DADGAD tuning which gives the same open chord only a tone lower. This opens up some lovely, incredibly simple new chord shapes that sit beautifully against standard chords coming from other instruments, but sounds very different due to the “drone” from leaving the B & E strings open and unmuted for the majority of chords. I think about it as being in the key of E and just needed to learn the new shapes. Here is a chord chart I made earlier:

A nice easy one to start with might be “This Is Our God” by Reuben Morgan, already in E. If you’ve got another guitarist with you, try them with a capo on fret 4 playing chords in C!
It’s also great to use further up the neck – try playing a song written in A with a full capo on fret 5 and the partial on 7.

The second position isn’t used so much, but that might be down to capos rather than by choice. Place the capo underneath the neck, again on the second fret, to cover the D-G-B strings. Strum an open chord and you have an A, very similar to open-G tuning which is the same a tone lower. The reason this position isn’t used as much is because your capo may get in the way of your hand meaning there are several chord shapes that become very tricky to land! But, if you’ve got a G7th Newport partial #3 capo then you should find that its low-profile design means you can easily reach around it to make the chords.

In a similar way to the first position, get your chords in the key of A and learn the new shapes from the chord chart below. This one is also a lot of fun to try sliding and hammering on extra notes – have a play and see how you get on!

Simon Campling works for G7th The Capo Company on their Marketing & Social Media team, and is a worship leader and drummer at his church in Peterborough, UK.

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