Posted by Craig Borlase on 29 May 2013

“The thing I like about you leading worship,” said my friend Ian, “is that you’re really not a worship leader. At all. Not even close.”

It was a fair point. He’d just attended a service where I’d experimented with something new by using a loop pedal, tons of delay and a hand drum to accompany a worship mashup that combined some Latin Taize chants with Our God Is A Great Big God. It failed, pretty spectacularly, but still I felt the slight sting as my buddy delivered his verdict. As a result, when it came to offering seconds of lasagne at lunch, Ian most certainly DID NOT get any of the crispy bits. 

According to Tim Ferriss, when it comes to online interactions, there are six principles for dealing with those who disagree with - and dislike - you. We should learn to:

*focus on those that do get what we do, rather than those that don’t

*expect to be criticised

*not work for affirmation

*expect to be criticised some more

*expect to be misunderstood

*focus even more clearly on what we feel we are called to do

*keep calm and carry on

Can the same be said of the world of church and worship? 

How do you deal with criticism?

Has anyone out there got a solution more effective than withholding lasagne? I doubt it, but it would be good to know for sure. 

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