Posted by Craig Borlase on 30 March 2015

It’s Holy Week, the time when we remember the single most significant point in human history. However, the chances are that you’re going to meet more than a few people this week who think that next weekend’s all about Easter Bunnies, chicks and chocolates. So this week we’re posting a series of short devotionals that get to the heart of the matter; why did Jesus have to die?

 

‘Then the man and his wife heard the sound of the Lord God as he was walking in the garden in the cool of the day, and they hid from the Lord God among the trees of the garden. But the Lord God called to the man, “Where are you?”

He answered, “I heard you in the garden, and I was afraid because I was naked; so I hid.”

And he said, “Who told you that you were naked? Have you eaten from the tree that I commanded you not to eat from?”

The man said, “The woman you put here with me—she gave me some fruit from the tree, and I ate it.”

Then the Lord God said to the woman, “What is this you have done?”

The woman said, “The serpent deceived me, and I ate.”
[Genesis 3:8-13, NIV]

Here we find the first - but not the last - of the Bible's depiction of sin. Eve eats an apple. Big deal. But God told her not to. Fair enough. But there's something else, something that the serpent does, something that he achieves that will help us on our way.
It needn't have been an apple - the fruit itself is symbolic - and I think we can assume that the serpent wasn't merely interested in passing on a tip to his fellow garden-dwellers to help them have a more pleasant stay. No, the serpent wanted to bring a separation between man and God. And it worked. Nearly. You get that bit about God strolling about the garden, quite likely that he'd bump into Adam and Eve? That all stopped after this incident, as the two young pups were no longer aloud to be within strolling distance. You see God cannot have sin around. It's not that he doesn't like it, not that is makes him itchy and uncomfortable. He cannot have it around, and sin cannot be around him.
What is sin? What does it do to us and our relationship with God? What do we think God would be like if he said sin and evil just didn’t matter? We know that sung worship helps us to feel closer to God, but do we need to make more space to deliberately guide people to dealing with their sin before God?

More like this

Faith In The Face Of Persecution: How much would you sacrifice for the sake of the gospel?

It’s communist China in the 1950s, and practising Christianity is a crime. Because of this Rev. Fang-Cheng is in jail. He has been tortured, all the time the communists trying to get from him the names of his fellow Christians. But Cheng refuses to tell them what they want to know.

words for an aspiring worship leader

A few days back someone got in touch and asked for some advice on how to make the transition from volunteer to full-time worship leader. Should they use social media as a tool to get some leverage and gain support? How could they tell the difference between God-given calling and own-brand ambition, enthusiasm and excitement?

What We Learned From Worship Central's 'Set Apart'

We’ve all seen it before; a polite sounding young chap with a clean haircut stands beside the River Thames and asks the world to pray. OK, perhaps it’s not an every day occurrence, but Worship Central’s recent call for people...