Posted by Craig Borlase on 17 July 2015

Tim Hughes’ fresh start in Birmingham is rich with metaphor. Not only does the Worship Central team get to work from the geographical centre of the UK, but Tim and the team of twenty others who have relocated from London find themselves planting a church in a building that has a beautiful backstory.

“It used to be place that distributed all the gas to light street lamps in Birmingham,” he says. “A place that gave light to whole city. It was derelict for fifteen or twenty years but now we have the chance to use the building to share hope, joy, creativity, to be a place that brings light to darkness.”

The Christian faith has always liked a bit of metaphor. Think about Jesus on the night he was arrested choosing to visit the garden of gethsemane - the place where olives were crushed, pressed and transformed into oil used for perfume, food and light.

Or the moment he was on the cross, his arms open wide, mirroring the invitation that his death offered to every single one of us.

It’s there in the title of Tim’s latest album too. A pocketful of anything doesn’t sound like much at all, but a pocketful of faith is a different matter altogether.

“It feels overwhelming to think about this new building we have that’s currently empty. Planting the church is the biggest thing I’ve ever been a part of. But I’m giving it all, taking the journey to see what God does through a few people, with a pocketful of faith.”

None of us are all that impressive on our own. The list of things we fail at far exceeds any tally of successes. But in the same way that He finds a new use for old buildings long past their prime, God offers each of us the chance to be woven into His story. And it’s the greatest one of all.

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