Posted by Todd Proctor on 30 September 2016

I plan worship sets that partner with the message being preached. At Rock Harbor Church, most of our worship is “backloaded”, creating a path of response to the truth from God’s Word. In preparing music, I try to choose a progression of songs that first linger in the revelation from Scripture, and ultimately lead to sacrifice.

One thing I have discovered in this process is the importance of “prepared spontaneity”— bringing many more songs than we will actually use. This allows us to adjust to the Spirit’s move in the moment — especially with band and lyric projection team in tow. We have found great freedom in not being confined to a predetermined script, yet still having enough language to sustain intimate conversation with God. In choosing worship songs, I prayerfully anticipate several different directions the Holy Spirit could take this conversation, and try to “pack enough songs” to follow.

[Taken from ‘Inside Out Worship: Insights for Passionate and Purposeful Worship’ by Matt Redman and friends, published by Kingsway Publications, reused with permission.]

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